Tags: traditional Chinese medicine

What do your cravings say about you? A Traditional Chinese Medicine approach

A look at what your cravings say about your health. A TCM approach.

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The Secrets of Tongue Diagnosis. Insights into What your Tongue Says about you and your Health.

The Secrets of Tongue Diagnosis We are all fascinated  with the thought of being able to tell the future, we are familiar with the magical mystical powers of the crystal ball or having our palms read.  Weather we believe these methods reveal the truth or not, it at the very least peeks our curiosity. The […]

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Treating ADHD with Chinese Medicine

Chinese Medicine offers a combination of Auricular Acupuncture (ear acupuncture) and Chinese herbal medicine to reduce hyperactivity as well as improve concentration and focus.

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Acutoronto at the Green Living Show

Acutoronto at the Green Living Show!!! Join Jennifer MacDonald, Naturopathic Doctor and Jenny Redding our Community Acupuncturist on April 25-27 at the Direct Energy Centre. Recharge your batteries with onsite acupuncture and healthy living tips to detox, energize and relax for a better you.

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Managing Type 2 Diabetes: A Naturopathic Medicine Perspective

Improving insulin sensitivity is a very important step towards avoiding the long term complications of diabetes. Long term complications of diabetes occur when blood glucose levels are not properly controlled. Excess glucose in the blood gets into the linings of both small and large blood vessels and damages them. This leads to damaged heart, kidneys, retina, and nerves (leading to reduced sensation in the hands and feet).

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Survive Motion Sickness with Acupuncture

If you’ve ever been riding in a car while reading a book and felt dizzy, tired and even nauseous you know what motion sickness is like. It doesn’t have to be in a car but on a boat or even during an activity like skiing where you may have felt this sudden sense anxiousness and vomiting.
The good news is that current research supports the efficacy of not only acupuncture but acupressure on an acupuncture point called PC6 (2 finger breadths above the center of your wrist) to greatly diminishes the symptoms of visually-induced motion sickeness.

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Get in touch

416-486-5222

Acutoronto
Yonge Eglinton Medical Centre
2401 Yonge St, Suite 205
Toronto, ON M4P 3H1